Ophthalmology

Our vision is precious. We use our eyes not only to take in information about our world, but also to connect and communicate our feelings with those around us.

Ophthalmology at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center specializes in helping children of all ages protect and maintain healthy eyes.

We offer both routine care, like regular eye examinations and treating eye infections, as well as specialized care for children with more serious vision problems. We have a full-service optical store onsite that offers one-stop shopping if your child needs corrective lenses.

Make An Appointment

Make An Appointment

Phone 402-955-6799 | Fax 402-955-4184

What Sets Children’s Apart?

At Children’s, our optometrists use advanced technology to perform intense eye exams and to look more deeply into patients’ retinas. Unlike some other eye care centers, our optometrists specialize in treating children from babies to teens.

In addition to routine eye care, we treat children with more significant vision problems. Our eye specialist, Donny Suh, MD, is a board-certified ophthalmologist and surgeon. He is one of the only pediatric ophthalmologists in the area and patients travel from around the world to see him.

As part of our mission to reach out to the community, we are finishing a Visionmobile. The Visionmobile will travel to Omaha public schools to provide eye exams for children. Our goal is to ensure that every child in the Omaha area has access to the highest level of vision care.

What To Expect For Routine Eye Care

The method used for each vision screening will depend on your child’s age. The exam will usually include an inspection of the eye, pupil, and cornea using an ophthalmoscope. This instrument projects a beam of light into the eye and has a special magnifying lens that the examiner looks through. This lens allows the examiner to see the interior parts of the eye and chefrck for any problems.

An optometrist will also test to make sure that your child’s eyes are aligned properly (meaning that one or both eyes are not “crossed” or off-center). The optometrist also will check your child’s vision using symbols or letters, testing both eyes at first, and then testing one eye at a time.

These kinds of screenings can detect a variety of vision problems. They can also help detect conditions like neurological diseases and tumors that may affect your child’s vision.

Regular vision screenings are recommended throughout childhood. These screenings will indicate whether your child needs a more comprehensive, complete eye exam.

Conditions We Treat

At Children’s, we treat many different kinds of eye problems and disorders, including:

  • Amblyopia

    Sometimes called “lazy eye,” this condition occurs when one eye sees much better than the other. It’s often the result of strabismus, which occurs when one eye turns out, up, or down, either constantly or intermittently.
  • Astigmatism

    This occurs when the lens or the cornea is misshapen, which interferes with the eye’s ability to focus. Children are usually prescribed glasses or contacts to focus their vision properly.
  • Blocked Tear Duct

    This prevents tears from draining normally. Babies are sometimes born with a blocked tear duct, which may clear up on its own as a baby’s eye drainage system matures. Other times, treatment may be needed (such as massage, minor office procedures, or surgery). Your baby’s pediatrician will explain the options available.
  • Cataract

    When the lens of the eye appears cloudy, which interferes with vision. Though more common in adults, children can have cataracts too.
  • Chalazion

    Occurs when an oil-secreting gland in the eyelid becomes clogged, making a small lump on the eyelid.
  • Conjunctivitis

    Commonly called “pink eye,” this infection causes the eye to turn red and produce tears and discharge. It may also cause itching. Conjunctivitis can be caused by a virus or bacteria, or by an allergic reaction.
  • Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)-Associated Uveitis

    When part of the eye becomes inflamed, because of an infection or autoimmune disease like juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). This is a serious condition that must be treated immediately to avoid permanent vision problems.
  • Myopia

    Commonly known as nearsightedness, this condition is caused by a misshapen lens or retina. People with myopia can see nearby objects clearly, but objects in the distance appear blurry. Once diagnosed, your child is usually prescribed glasses or contact lenses, or may be a candidate for laser surgery.
  • Preseptal, or Orbital, Cellulitis

    An infection in the eye. This serious condition may be caused by a cold or the flu, a trauma to the eye, or an infection in the eyelid itself.
  • Ptosis

    When the eyelid droops over the eye, blocking vision.
  • Stye

    A painful red bump that forms near the edge of the eyelid, caused by an infected eyelash follicle.
  • Strabismus, or Hypertropia, (commonly referred to as “crossed eyes”)

    When one eye rolls in or outward instead of remaining focused. Newborn babies may have this but usually outgrow it by the time they’re 3 months old.

Our Specialist

Donny Suh, M.D.

Ophthalmology

Whitney R. Brown, O.D.

Ophthalmology

Colby Fletcher, OD

Ophthalmology

What To Do Next

For Patients

Make An Appointment

To make an appointment, call 402-955-6799.

For Referring Providers

The Physicians’ Priority Line is your 24-hour link to pediatric specialists at Children’s for referrals, emergency and urgent consults, physician-to-physician consults, admissions, and transport services. Call 855-850-KIDS (5437).

Learn more about referring patients.

Back To Top